Although still not commonly classified as an essential service, in practice most of us depend on good, uninterrupted internet access for our work and leisure pursuits.

This page provides and overview of the main UK broadband providers, summarises recent industry news, and gives some advice and tips, as well as sources for further support.

Contents of this page



Category index

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Providers database

Two main networks provide broadband cables to homes in the UK: OpenReach (the BT network), and Virgin Media (which came from the consolidation of various cable TV companies). Nearly all broadband providers run on one of these two networks.

The exceptions, such as Community Fibre and Hyperoptic, have laid their own network. Generally you’re able to easily switch between providers on the OpenReach Network (including BT, EE, and Plusnet) without a visit from an engineer.

<aside> ☎️ Ofcom, the sector regulator, published a report in May 2022 on Broadband and Mobile customer service levels

https://www.ofcom.org.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0030/237639/comparing-customer-service-report-2022.pdf

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Broadband providers


How to save money on broadband

<aside> 💡 Cheaper broadband is available to those in receipt of Universal Credit and some other benefits. Read our guide on broadband social tariffs to find out more:

Broadband social tariffs

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<aside> 🛠️ For the most up-to-date practical advice, read our guide to Saving money on broadband.

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<aside> <img src="https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/secure.notion-static.com/9ae4fcda-a6c4-4f18-83fd-b67c9dc3e0b5/arch-yellow.png" alt="https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/secure.notion-static.com/9ae4fcda-a6c4-4f18-83fd-b67c9dc3e0b5/arch-yellow.png" width="40px" /> By our estimates, a typical household could save £190 a year by switching broadband provider.

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Broadband providers often win new customers with a low introductory rate which include mid-contract increases tied to inflation, plus a further discretionary amount on top. When contracts end, prices may increase even further, and out-of-contract rates certainly won’t be as low as the same provider’s available introductory offers.

Additionally, the UK’s broadband infrastructure is undergoing a high-speed upgrade, meaning the availability of broadband services in your area may have improved since you last switched. You can check what services are in your area using the Ofcom availability checker.

<aside> ℹ️ View broadband coverage with the Ofcom availability checker

https://checker.ofcom.org.uk/en-gb/broadband-coverage

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If you’re happy with your current service, but don’t want to overpay once your contract ends, you should contact your provider’s retention department and ask for their best deal.